The Meaning of “Noon Blue Apples”: the “One-Day Grapes” of Dionysus

In the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau, France (which I wrote about in my 2004 book The Merovingian Mythos and the Mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau), there is the phrase “at noon blue apples” that comes at the end of a coded message discovered at the church of Mary Magdalene there in the village. The words “blue apples” have usually been taken as a term for grapes, on the allegation that this is an idiom in use amongst the rural population there. This then, is often taken as a reference to wine, and the vine, and thus an allegory of blood and a bloodline, particularly the Merovingian royal dynasty of France that is at the heart of the Rennes-le-Chateau enigma. There are other interpretations as well. As for the reason why they are said to be “at noon,” there are many theories also, but it is still unknown. The whole message that this phrase is a part of is a series of nonsequitors, the meaning of which can only be speculated at. However, I think I have found, quite by accident, what “at noon blue apples” refers to, if “blue apples” are in fact grapes. From Robert Eisler’s 1920 book Orpheus the Fisher, we read about the mystery cult of Dionysus, and a strange, perhaps supernatural phenomenon that their rituals supposedly included, involving grapes that ripen at noon and go bad at night. Eisler writes:

Elements of the Eucharist
Elements of the Eucharist

We have in fact a fragment of Euphorion, which tells us about the following regularly-recurring miracle of the god: while the women are dancing frenziedly in honor of Dionysos during his annual mysteries, the mysterious, ephemeral or one-day grapes are ripened; they begin ripening in the morning, are mature at noon, made must of in the evening, and this fresh must does not diminish or come to an end before the termination of the feast, however much may be drunk of it.

Outside of the Blue Apple, a restaurant in Rennes-le-Chateau, France. Photo by Tracy R. Twyman
Outside of the Blue Apple, a restaurant in Rennes-le-Chateau, France. Photo by Tracy R. Twyman

There are several comparisons that come to mind upon reading this. One is the “Manna” that the Israelites ate while in the wilderness during the Exodus. They had to gather it in the morning and eat it the same day and could not save it for the next day because it would go bad before morning, seemingly miraculously. Eisler uses the word “ephemeral” to describe the one-day grapes, which makes me think that he thought them to be imaginary — an illusion that breaks at the end of a certain time, which is why it cannot be preserved for the future. In this regard, the other thing it reminds me of is the miracle of the wine at the “Wedding at Cana” in the Gospels, where Jesus made water appear to be wine, making it so that it tasted like it was the best, and had the most potent intoxicating effects, of all the wine served at the wedding. Authors have commented before about the possible “Dionysian” symbolism in this story, and its potential origins in the rites of his cult.

The wine miracle at Cana
The wine miracle at Cana

While there is certainly more to be said on this topic, at this point I just wanted to bring forth for consideration my proposal that whoever wrote the coded parchments discovered in the church at Rennes-le-Chateau know about this detail of Dionysian ritual, perhaps because these rites continued on in another form in underground cults there in the Languedoc region of France, and that this is why they mentioned it in their cryptic message. In The Merovingian Mythos I proposed the idea that the coded parchments, and most aspects of the mystery, had something to do with an occult ritual being undertaken by the secret societies involved in the matter over the course of several generations. This would fit in perfectly with that hypothesis.

Noon is time to party for Dionysus.
Noon is time to party for Dionysus.


Baphomet: The Temple Mystery Unveiled by Tracy R. Twyman and Alexander Rivera.

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“Can ye drink of the cup that I drink of? And be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?”

For seven centuries, the enigma of Baphomet has mystified both scholars and the general public. Did the Knights Templar really worship a demonic idol of that name? If so, what does the word mean? What is the origin of this figure? What was the nature of the rituals that the Templars performed in secret? What were their covert beliefs? And why, if the Templars initially described their idol as a mummified severed head, is this figure now represented as a hermaphrodite human with the head of a goat?

Authors Tracy R. Twyman and Alexander Rivera have dived head-first into the bottomless abyss of mystery and returned with some astounding wisdom to share. Here for the first time they reveal the genesis of these symbols, showing how they relate to the Witches’ Sabbath, traditions of Sufi Islam, alchemy, Gnosticism, cabalism, the teachings of Hermes Trismegistus, and so much more.

Learn why the Templars and their beloved severed head are frequently associated with John the Baptist, and how this connects to his student, Simon Magus. Discover the known facts about things like the Chinon Parchment, the Book of the Baptism of Fire, the Templar Abraxas seals, and newly-found documents which claim that the Templars discovered the real Temple of Solomon during a secret trip to Mecca.

Join Twyman and Rivera on this exciting adventure into the unknown. Immerse yourself in this knowledge, if your heart has the strength. It is certain that your mind will never be the same.
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