The Invisible Mountain and the Flat Earth

I am not necessarily a proponent of the “flat Earth theory” quite yet, but I find it very interesting. I have long been convinced that we are living in an artificial reality of some sort, whether it be a computer simulation, controlled hallucination, or whatever you might want to call it. To me, if this is the case, it doesn’t matter much the extent to which one can, as a participant in the simulation, explore places beyond Earth. If it is all purely artifice, it seems that it was put together with Earth as the “main event.”

So just as, in a video game, nothing exists for the players beyond what is shown and experienced, to most people, everything purported to be beyond our solar system is so abstract and remote that we feel no personal connection to it. Also, for thousands of years, the only experience man had of the stars and planets was what he could see with his own eyes from the surface of the Earth. Nowadays, when we look at the night’s sky, our minds immediately extrapolate from the “photos,” illustrations, and computer animations we’ve all seen in books and movies about outer space. Most of us will never experience anything outside of Earth’s atmosphere with our own senses, so our mental picture of what it’s like out there is informed only “data” from space agencies and, much more largely, by Hollywood fiction.

The Azimuthal Equidistant Projection map, said by flat-Earthers to be the true shape of the world.
The Azimuthal Equidistant Projection map, said by flat-Earthers to be the true shape of the world.

I have also long felt that this feeling of being in a fake reality is innate to most people, and that this is often expressed in the stories we tell. In myths, fairy tales, novels and movies, motifs are commonly found in which this is implied. I wrote about this a bit in my “Film as Myth” essay, which I intend to expand upon at some point. The story pattern is similar to that of Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey,” although I see the symbolism indicating something a bit more sinister than he did. The “journey” we speak of here is one that the hero of such a story must take through treacherous and labyrinthine territory (represented as a maze, a forest, etc.) to reach the “center” of existence, where the ultimate truth and a treasure capable of solving the hero’s problems can be found.

Often the territory is shown as ever-shifting, constantly changing, as shown in the films Krull and Stalker. An object referred to in alchemy as the “Compass of the Wise” is used by the hero in these stories to find the path to the center. If the Earth were actually flat, and the shape of it is being hidden from us by our rulers, then the true distances and relationships between things on Earth won’t match up with our maps and GPS systems. A true explorer, someone trying to navigate the Earth on their own without using the “system of travel” constructed by our gatekeepers to hide the truth, will quickly become lost without another form of guidance besides these flawed maps.

In mythology, this “center” is represented as a mountain–the tallest on Earth, with its summit reaching the heavens. This is probably the most common mythological symbol in the world, found in almost every culture. Flat Earth proponent Eric Dubay believes that this mountain is real. On the flat Earth map, there is no “South Pole,” but rather a circular ice wall surrounding the flat disc Earth that has been misidentified as a continent (Antarctica). The North Pole is thus in the exact center of the Earth, and that, presumably, would be where this mountain is located.

The Invisible Mountain of the Wise, by Robert Vaughn, 1681
The Invisible Mountain of the Wise, by Robert Vaughn, 1681

This connects with something I wrote about the “Invisible Mountain” that writer Rene Daumal proposed to exist. His book Mount Analogue was the inspiration for the alchemical film The Holy Mountain by Alejandro Jodorowsky. Daumal (via his fiction) suggested that an invisible mountain higher than Mount Everest, with a base larger than Australia, might exist within what appears to be the “hemisphere of water” that is shown on globes (with most of the land masses of the world being situated on the other side of the world). In his book, the characters discover the existence of the mountain after theorizing that the distribution of land mass implied something with heavy gravitational pull on the other side. In his novel, the mountain is made of extremely dense materials so that its gravity actually bends the light waves around it, accounting for its invisibility.

The Hemisphere of Water, as shown by Google Earth
The Hemisphere of Water, as shown by Google Earth

Of course, many flat-Earthers say there is no such thing as gravity, rejecting much of Newtonian and Einsteinian physics and claiming that it was a false concept invented to support the globe Earth model. Dubay suggests that the mountain is magnetic (thus creating “magnetic North”), which is what all of the myths about it suggest, and explains why the “compass of the wise” is able to locate it.

The One True Compass from Hercules and the Lost Kingdom
The One True Compass from Hercules and the Lost Kingdom

Flat Earth theorists also most commonly suggest that most of the things purported to exist in outer space are fictional. The Sun, Moon and observable planets are not what we think they are, being much closer than we are told, and all part of an artificial system. Some observers have even claimed that the moon is translucent and that they have seen stars shining through it. This has been suggested to be the true meaning of the symbol of the crescent moon with a star next to it, an emblem associated with Islam, and also found on almost all Ouija boards. Crow777, who has not even ventured into the flat Earth subject at all, has presented evidence that the moon is some sort of holographic projection, and has captured video multiple times of a scan line running across it (similar to that which one would see if you pointed a video camera at the screen of an old analog TV).

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While I again am in no position to actually promote this idea, (since only people who actually work in “space” would know), I do find it intriguing as a possible model of what I suspect to be an artificial system that we are trapped inside of. Since I feel that our works of art tend to reflect our innate understandings of these things (and may also deliberately communicate hidden information), I think it is worth looking at things like popular films and songs to see if they contain hints or clues pointing at this. Yesterday, while pondering these matters, I stumbled upon what I think is a pattern within the music of the band R.E.M., as well as a couple of films starring Jim Carrey, that I think points to knowledge of the flat Earth theory. This is interesting considering that these works were made before the current popular flat Earth trend. Amazingly, after making a number of notes on the subject, I found that Eric Dubay had already written a bit about the symbolism of the Jim Carrey films, and had mentioned one of the R.E.M. songs in question. This made me feel a little bit better about discussing my ideas on this topic in public. Therefore, I will discuss this in-depth in the next post I make.


Baphomet: The Temple Mystery Unveiled by Tracy R. Twyman and Alexander Rivera.

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“Can ye drink of the cup that I drink of? And be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?”

For seven centuries, the enigma of Baphomet has mystified both scholars and the general public. Did the Knights Templar really worship a demonic idol of that name? If so, what does the word mean? What is the origin of this figure? What was the nature of the rituals that the Templars performed in secret? What were their covert beliefs? And why, if the Templars initially described their idol as a mummified severed head, is this figure now represented as a hermaphrodite human with the head of a goat?

Authors Tracy R. Twyman and Alexander Rivera have dived head-first into the bottomless abyss of mystery and returned with some astounding wisdom to share. Here for the first time they reveal the genesis of these symbols, showing how they relate to the Witches’ Sabbath, traditions of Sufi Islam, alchemy, Gnosticism, cabalism, the teachings of Hermes Trismegistus, and so much more.

Learn why the Templars and their beloved severed head are frequently associated with John the Baptist, and how this connects to his student, Simon Magus. Discover the known facts about things like the Chinon Parchment, the Book of the Baptism of Fire, the Templar Abraxas seals, and newly-found documents which claim that the Templars discovered the real Temple of Solomon during a secret trip to Mecca.

Join Twyman and Rivera on this exciting adventure into the unknown. Immerse yourself in this knowledge, if your heart has the strength. It is certain that your mind will never be the same.